National News | WRHL http://www.wrhl.net/pages/index.cfm?id=491 National News 2014-08-22T10:42:01Z National News #version=9,0,0,0" width="300" height="54" id="CBSNews_v2" align="middle"> U.S. missionary still physically recovering after Ebola, son says Nancy Writebol, 59, of Charlotte, North Carolina, was discharged earlier this week from Emory University Hospital after doctors said her symptoms had eased and blood and urine tests showed no evidence of the virus. Dr. Kent Brantly, who also was stricken with Ebola in Liberia, was released on Thursday. "She's tired and trying to rest," her son Jeremy told NBC. She seems pretty happy." Speaking alongside his brother Brian, he said the family has experienced "the lowest of lows and at the same time the highest of highs" since Writebol contracted the Ebola virus in July while working for a Christian mission organization in Liberia, grappling first with her potential death and later her recovery. Violence-weary Missouri town sees second night of calm By Nick Carey and Carey Gillam FERGUSON Mo. (Reuters) - The violence-weary town of Ferguson, Missouri, saw a second straight evening of relative calm on Thursday after the fatal shooting of an unarmed black teen nearly two weeks ago. Police, who were widely criticized for using heavy-handed tactics to quell earlier protests over the death of 18-year-old Michael Brown, made only isolated arrests as local clergy and civic leaders worked to keep protests orderly. In an apparent sign of easing tensions, Captain Ron Johnson, a black State Highway Patrol officer placed in command last week after the criticism of the local police, said a drawdown of National Guard troops would begin on Friday. Governor Jay Nixon ordered the National Guard deployment to help quell the looting and vandalism that have accompanied the nightly protest rallies over Brown's death on Aug. 9, but the troops have largely kept a low profile. U.S. brings new charges against accused Silk Road creator A new indictment against Ross Ulbricht, 30, filed late on Thursday in Manhattan federal court added charges of narcotics trafficking, distribution of narcotics by means of the Internet, and conspiracy to traffic in fraudulent identification documents. Ulbricht, who prosecutors said was known online as "Dread Pirate Roberts," lost his bid to dismiss the earlier charges in July. It also accused Ulbricht of engaging in a conspiracy to sell fake ID documents, such as driver's licenses and passports, on Silk Road. Federal authorities shut down Silk Road last year, though a new Internet marketplace under the same name debuted in November. Alabama teacher suspended after shooting lesson SELMA, Ala. (AP) — An Alabama schoolteacher is suspended without pay after being accused of having students re-enact the deadly police shooting in Ferguson, Missouri, and the Trayvon Martin killing in Florida. Ex-Va. governor: CEO's loans not inappropriate RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell says he took a second loan from a wealthy businessman because it was offered. Union group seeks quick ruling on Illinois pension reform lawsuit A coalition of public labor unions is seeking an expedited ruling in consolidated lawsuits challenging the constitutionality of a new Illinois pension law. We Are One Illinois and other parties filed a motion in Sangamon County Circuit Court on Thursday asking for a ruling in their favor in light of a July Illinois Supreme Court decision that underscored state constitutional protection for public sector retirement benefits. The state's high court ruled on July 3 that health care for retired state workers is a pension benefit protected by a state constitutional provision prohibiting the diminishment or impairment of those benefits. The same provision is the focus of the lawsuits filed against the pension reform law the Illinois legislature passed in December. Washington wildfire burn scars turn into mudslides TWISP, Wash. (AP) — Highway crews are trying to clear mud and debris that that washed onto roadways when heavy rain fell on land scarred by wildfires in north central Washington. 1990 arson-murder rap tossed, man is set free A former New York businessman whose arson-murder conviction was overturned in the death of his daughter was freed from prison Friday after 24 years behind bars, following a judge's ruling that the case against him had been based on now-debunked arson science. Dentist at center of health scare cedes license OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — An Oklahoma oral surgeon whose filthy clinics led to the testing of thousands of patients for HIV and hepatitis permanently surrendered his professional license on Friday. Vegas' storied Sahara casino reborn, transformed LAS VEGAS (AP) — The Moroccan-themed Sahara casino that once hosted Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and the Beatles seemed a lost cause in 2011, when its owners declared the 59-year-old property unprofitable and shut it down with little more than a vague promise to return. Guidelines spell end of Ohio schools' pink cookie ELYRIA, Ohio (AP) — A favorite — and locally famous — cafeteria treat is off the menu forever in one northeast Ohio school system because of new federal nutritional guidelines. American Ebola doc urges help fighting outbreak ATLANTA (AP) — As one of few Ebola survivors with medical expertise, Dr. Kent Brantly seems keenly aware of the position his painful experience has put him in. He hasn't spoken yet about his plans, but spent much of his first public appearance pleading for help for countries still struggling with the virus. Islamic State backers under scrutiny in US NEW YORK (AP) — Officially, the FBI agents who swarmed Donald Ray Morgan at Kennedy Airport this month were there to arrest him on a mundane gun charge. But they whisked him away to their Manhattan office and grilled him for two hours on an entirely different topic: Islamic State extremists. Early grape crush kicks off California's winemaking season By Jennifer Chaussee DAVIS California (Reuters) - At the University of California's prized winemaking institute near Sacramento, a sleek metal wine crusher on Thursday morning let out a deep rumble and began to shake, jostling grapes made sweeter by the state's ongoing drought into sticky juice. "All right, let's go!" hollered Chik Brenneman, resident winemaker at U.C. Davis, to his team of four student workers. A teal-colored tractor dumped a square plastic drum of freshly harvested Chardonnay grapes into the mouth of the roaring machine and an earthy, tangy smell like fall leaves and sour fruit filled the air. The early harvest has stoked winemakers' concerns that ongoing drought conditions could pose a serious threat to wine quality next year, since grapes that ripen too fast can become too sweet for winemaking. Stocks little changed on Ukraine, Yellen speech NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks were little changed Friday after a speech by Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen left investors unsure on how the nation's most important financial voice feels about raising interest rates in the coming months. Oklahoma officer accused in 6 sexual assaults OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — An Oklahoma City police officer is accused of sexually assaulting at least six women during traffic stops, and investigators are trying to track down yet more potential victims. Oklahoma Catholic bishop drops suit over planned 'black mass' By Heide Brandes OKLAHOMA CITY (Reuters) - The Catholic Archdiocese of Oklahoma on Thursday dropped a lawsuit filed a day earlier against a Satanic church after it turned over to a Catholic priest a consecrated host, or communion wafer, Satanists planned to use in a "black mass." "I am relieved that we have been able to secure the return of the sacred Host and that we have prevented its desecration as part of a planned Satanic ritual. A lawyer for the Angra Mainyu Satanic group named in the suit turned over the communion wafer on Thursday. The Catholic Archdiocese claimed the communion wafer was obtained "by illicit means." Adam Daniels, leader of Angra Mainyu, said the wafer was sent to him from a priest in Turkey who is also a Satanist. Parents had hoped to negotiate with Foley captors ROCHESTER, N.H. (AP) — The parents of slain journalist James Foley said they regarded an email they received from his captors last week as a hopeful sign they could negotiate with the Islamic militants. Ace Bayou recalls 2.2 million beanbag chairs after two deaths Ace Bayou Corp is recalling about 2.2 million beanbag chairs after the suffocation deaths of two children, the company and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission said on Friday. Chicago police investigating killing of nine-year-old boy By Mary Wisniewski CHICAGO (Reuters) - Chicago police are investigating the killing of a 9-year-old boy, and a local Catholic church is offering $5,000 for information leading to his killer's arrest, police and church officials said on Thursday. Police found the boy, identified by local media and a church pastor as Antonio Smith, shot multiple times in a South Side backyard on Wednesday afternoon. The pastor, the Reverend Michael Pfleger of St. Sabina's, said that besides offering the reward, the South Side parish plans a vigil at the shooting location Thursday evening. Chicago has seen a rash of summer gun violence, although the city's murder rate has been relatively unchanged in recent years and is down sharply from the 1990s. Ice bucket challenge goes awry, firefighters hurt CAMPBELLSVILLE, Ky. (AP) — A charity stunt that has grown into a social media phenomenon went terribly wrong for four Kentucky firefighters when a fire truck's ladder got too close to a power line after they dumped water on college students who were taking part in an "ice bucket challenge." Feds: Meat sold from cows with cancer; 4 indicted A Northern California slaughterhouse involved in a massive beef recall processed cows with cancer while U.S. livestock inspectors took lunch breaks and later distributed the diseased cattle, according to federal charges announced Monday. Suspect shoots man dead, waits for police to arrive in Frankford "It is unusual," said Philadelphia Police Chief Inspector Scott Small. "Normally the shooter flees after firing the weapon." Europe launches 2 navigation satellites BERLIN (AP) — The European Space Agency says two satellites for its new global navigation system have been lifted into orbit aboard a modified Soyuz rocket. 2 parolees charged in suburban Chicago standoff CHICAGO (AP) — Both suspects in a 20-hour hostage standoff this week in a Chicago suburb are parolees, and one is a convicted murderer who was under electronic monitoring. Masked gunman robs Pizza Hut in Tacony Philadelphia police are on the hunt for a suspect who robbed a pizza shop at gunpoint in the city's Tacony section Wednesday night. 6 soldiers hurt by lightning strike at Fort Drum FORT DRUM, N.Y. (AP) — Army officials say six soldiers are recovering after lightning struck during a field exercise at Fort Drum in northern New York. This Week in the Civil War This Week in The Civil War for Sunday, Aug. 24: Battle of the Petersburg, Virginia, railroad. Police: Cab driver sexually assaulted female passenger A cab driver has been arrested and charged with sexually assaulted a female passenger. Russian ban on Polish apples sparks cider debate WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Poland's Economy Ministry wants the nation of beer and vodka lovers to drink more cider. Bond hearing set for accused Tulsa officer TULSA, Okla. (AP) — A veteran Tulsa police officer charged in the off-duty fatal shooting of his daughter's boyfriend earlier this month is set to ask a judge that he be released on bond. WRHL 2014-08-22T15:42:01Z http://www.wrhl.net/pages/index.cfm?id=491