National News | WRHL http://www.wrhl.net/pages/index.cfm?id=491 National News 2014-04-20T04:08:58Z National News #version=9,0,0,0" width="300" height="54" id="CBSNews_v2" align="middle"> Boston Marathon looks to emerge from shadow of 2013 bombing By Scott Malone BOSTON (Reuters) - Runners from the world's elite racers to first-timers will step to the Boston Marathon starting line on Monday for the first time the race has been held since last year's deadly bombing attack. Some 36,000 people, the second-largest field in the race's 118-year history, will set out from Hopkinton, a town west of Boston, for the 26.2-mile race that finishes on Boston's Boylston Street, where two homemade pressure-cooker bombs last year killed three people and injured 264. The fans, hundreds of thousands of whom are expected to line the course, will also be rooting for top U.S. entrants including Ryan Hall of California and Desiree Linden of Michigan. Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick on Sunday told CBS's "Face the Nation" that added security measures, including a higher than usual police presence, would assure a "very safe" atmosphere at the race. Sleeping California teen killed when car plows into apartment (Reuters) - A 16-year-old girl asleep in her bed was killed early Sunday when a suspected drunk driver careened into an apartment building in southern California, law enforcement officials said. The crash occurred at 3:15 a.m. local time in Palmdale, which is located about 63 miles north of downtown Los Angeles. Robert Rodriguez, 20, of Palmdale, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol and was charged at the Palmdale Sheriff's Station with vehicular manslaughter, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said in a statement. "The driver was at a high rate of speed and either tried to turn or lost control, impacted the curb and went into the apartment building," Sergeant David Sauer of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said. Brother, sister, both four, die in New York house fire on Easter morning A house fire that left two young children dead early Easter Sunday in New York City was sparked accidentally, possibly by a child playing with a lighter or matches, emergency officials said. The 4-year-old half-siblings, a boy and a girl, were at their grandfather's home in the city borough of Queens when the blaze broke out in the basement just before midnight on Saturday, a spokesman with the New York City Fire Department said. A firefighter suffered mild injuries, the fire department spokesman said. The children were regular visitors to their grandfather's house, neighbors told local media. Part of Fla. history to step back into spotlight TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Hidden behind live oaks and magnolias near the Florida Governor's Mansion, a historic house that symbolizes much of the state's terrible past and transformation will soon have its doors opened to the public. In Colorado, a pot holiday tries to go mainstream DENVER (AP) — Once the province of activists and stoners, the traditional pot holiday of April 20 has gone mainstream in the first state in the nation to legalize recreational marijuana. 4-year-old half siblings die in accidental NY fire NEW YORK (AP) — A basement blaze that killed 4-year-old half siblings was accidentally set by children playing with fire, authorities said Sunday. AP Top News at 3:51 p.m. EDT VATICAN CITY (AP) — Marking Christianity's most hopeful day, Pope Francis made an Easter Sunday plea for peace and dialogue in Ukraine and Syria, for an end to terrorist attacks against Christians in Nigeria and for more attention to the hungry and neediest close to home. Well over 150,000 tourists — Romans and pilgrims, young and old — turned out for the Mass that Francis celebrated at an altar set up under a canopy on the steps of St. Peter's Basilica. AP Top News at 3:45 p.m. EDT VATICAN CITY (AP) — Marking Christianity's most hopeful day, Pope Francis made an Easter Sunday plea for peace and dialogue in Ukraine and Syria, for an end to terrorist attacks against Christians in Nigeria and for more attention to the hungry and neediest close to home. Well over 150,000 tourists — Romans and pilgrims, young and old — turned out for the Mass that Francis celebrated at an altar set up under a canopy on the steps of St. Peter's Basilica. AP Top News at 3:40 p.m. EDT VATICAN CITY (AP) — Marking Christianity's most hopeful day, Pope Francis made an Easter Sunday plea for peace and dialogue in Ukraine and Syria, for an end to terrorist attacks against Christians in Nigeria and for more attention to the hungry and neediest close to home. Well over 150,000 tourists — Romans and pilgrims, young and old — turned out for the Mass that Francis celebrated at an altar set up under a canopy on the steps of St. Peter's Basilica. AP Top News at 3:35 p.m. EDT VATICAN CITY (AP) — Marking Christianity's most hopeful day, Pope Francis made an Easter Sunday plea for peace and dialogue in Ukraine and Syria, for an end to terrorist attacks against Christians in Nigeria and for more attention to the hungry and neediest close to home. Well over 150,000 tourists — Romans and pilgrims, young and old — turned out for the Mass that Francis celebrated at an altar set up under a canopy on the steps of St. Peter's Basilica. Memorial for 11 serial-killing victims needs $250K CLEVELAND (AP) — Construction of a memorial at the Cleveland site where the remains of 11 women were found in a serial killer's home has been delayed because its funding is short by $250,000. AP Top News at 3:30 p.m. EDT VATICAN CITY (AP) — Marking Christianity's most hopeful day, Pope Francis made an Easter Sunday plea for peace and dialogue in Ukraine and Syria, for an end to terrorist attacks against Christians in Nigeria and for more attention to the hungry and neediest close to home. Well over 150,000 tourists — Romans and pilgrims, young and old — turned out for the Mass that Francis celebrated at an altar set up under a canopy on the steps of St. Peter's Basilica. AP Photos: Christians seek hope in Easter events From the splendor of the Vatican to some of the world's most troubled regions, Christians worldwide sought hope Sunday in their religion's holiest event — the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus. Marijuana fans pack 4/20 events in Colorado, Washington state By Keith Coffman DENVER (Reuters) - Thousands of marijuana enthusiasts gathered in Colorado and Washington state over the weekend for an annual celebration of cannabis culture with rallies, concerts and trade shows in the first two states to legalize recreational marijuana. Voters in the two Western states in 2012 approved the legalization of possession and use of weed by adults on private property, although public consumption is still illegal. In January the first retail pot shops opened in Colorado, and stores in Washington are set to follow suit later this year. On Saturday, police issued 32 citations, 22 for public consumption of marijuana and 10 for other offenses at the gathering, said Denver Police spokesman Sonny Jackson. Festive hats, pastels abound at NYC Easter parade NEW YORK (AP) — Most New Yorkers showed their best colors in the annual Easter Parade on Fifth Avenue, but a few may have dusted off their Halloween outfits. 'Capt. America' tops box office for third week LOS ANGELES (AP) — Captain America continues to vanquish box office foes, triumphing in ticket sales for the third consecutive week and dominating over megastar Johnny Depp's new movie. Rubin 'Hurricane' Carter, U.S. boxer famous in folk song, dies at 76 By Cameron French and Emily Flitter TORONTO/NEW YORK (Reuters) - Former U.S. professional boxer Rubin "Hurricane" Carter, who spent 19 years in prison for murder and then was released after it was determined he did not get a fair trial, died on Sunday at the age of 76, according to his friend and caretaker John Artis. Carter, considered a folk hero by many and immortalized in film and song, had been battling prostate cancer for nearly three years, Artis said. He died at home in Toronto, where he had been living since he was released from prison in 1985. That arrest, his imprisonment, and the ultimately successful battle to free him are immortalized in the 1975 Bob Dylan song "Hurricane" and the 1999 film of the same name, which starred Denzel Washington as Carter. Sleeping girl killed in alleged drunk driver crash PALMDALE, Calif. (AP) — A 16-year-old Southern California girl was killed while sleeping in her bed after an alleged drunken driver crashed his SUV into her home. General Mills scraps controversial new legal terms NEW YORK (AP) — General Mills is scrapping a controversial plan to strip consumers of their right to sue the food company. Brand names in NY standardized tests vex parents NEW YORK (AP) — "Just Do It" has been a familiar Nike slogan for years, but some parents are wondering what it was doing on some of New York's Common Core standardized English tests. Navy OKs changes for submariners' sleep schedules GROTON, Conn. (AP) — With no sunlight to set day apart from night on a submarine, the U.S. Navy for decades has staggered sailors' working hours on schedules with little resemblance to life above the ocean's surface. Study: Fuels from corn waste not better than gas WASHINGTON (AP) — Biofuels made from the leftovers of harvested corn plants are worse than gasoline for global warming in the short term, a study shows, challenging the Obama administration's conclusions that they are a much cleaner oil alternative and will help combat climate change. AP Top News at 1:11 p.m. EDT VATICAN CITY (AP) — Marking Christianity's most hopeful day, Pope Francis made an Easter Sunday plea for peace and dialogue in Ukraine and Syria, for an end to terrorist attacks against Christians in Nigeria and for more attention to the hungry and neediest close to home. Well over 150,000 tourists — Romans and pilgrims, young and old — turned out for the Mass that Francis celebrated at an altar set up under a canopy on the steps of St. Peter's Basilica. AP Top News at 1:08 p.m. EDT VATICAN CITY (AP) — Marking Christianity's most hopeful day, Pope Francis made an Easter Sunday plea for peace and dialogue in Ukraine and Syria, for an end to terrorist attacks against Christians in Nigeria and for more attention to the hungry and neediest close to home. Well over 150,000 tourists — Romans and pilgrims, young and old — turned out for the Mass that Francis celebrated at an altar set up under a canopy on the steps of St. Peter's Basilica. Fracking foes cringe as unions back drilling boom PITTSBURGH (AP) — After early complaints that out-of-state firms got the most jobs, some local construction trade workers and union members in Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia say they're now benefiting in a big way from the Marcellus and Utica Shale oil and gas boom. Easter morning delivery for space station CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Space station astronauts got a special Easter treat: a cargo ship full of supplies. Ohio couple married for 70 years dies hours apart An Ohio couple who met as teenagers and were married for 70 years, almost never sleeping apart, died from natural causes within a span of 15 hours, according to their daughter. Helen Felumlee, 92, died on April 12 at their home in Nashport, Ohio, about 55 miles east of Columbus, and her husband Kenneth Felumlee, 91, passed away the next day, according to their joint obituary. "We knew when one went, the other was going to go," daughter Linda Cody told the Zanesville Times Recorder. APNewsBreak: Africa land grabs endanger elephants WASHINGTON (AP) — Political and military elites are seizing protected areas in one of Africa's last bastions for elephants, putting broad swaths of Zimbabwe at risk of becoming fronts for ivory poaching, according to a nonprofit research group's report that examines government collusion in wildlife trafficking. Lawmakers call for tighter sanctions on Russia WASHINGTON (AP) — Two members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee called Sunday for beefing up western sanctions against Russia to include its petrochemical and banking industries and warned that Moscow thus far has ignored United States and European efforts to persuade it to back off its confrontation with Ukraine. AP Top News at 10:45 a.m. EDT JINDO, South Korea (AP) — A transcript released Sunday shows the South Korean ferry that sank was crippled with confusion and indecision well after it began listing dangerously, possibly adding to a death toll that is officially at 58 but could eventually exceed 300. Three times in succession, and about half an hour after the ferry Sewol began tilting on Wednesday, a crew member asked Jindo Vessel Traffic Services Center (VTS) whether passengers would be rescued if they abandoned ship off South Korea's southern coast. That followed several statements from the ship that it was impossible for people aboard to even move, and another in which it said it was "impossible to broadcast" instructions. WRHL 2014-04-20T21:08:58Z http://www.wrhl.net/pages/index.cfm?id=491