National News | WRHL http://www.wrhl.net/pages/index.cfm?id=491 National News 2014-04-24T08:35:39Z National News #version=9,0,0,0" width="300" height="54" id="CBSNews_v2" align="middle"> Justice Department's criminal division names new No. 2 By Aruna Viswanatha WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Department of Justice has named Marshall Miller as the new No. 2 official in its criminal division, after a spate of departures thinned its top ranks, according to an internal memo obtained on Wednesday. Miller, who was most recently chief of the criminal division at the U.S. Attorney's office in Brooklyn, is now the deputy head of the 600-lawyer criminal division at department headquarters in Washington, said a DoJ memo dated April 17. "He's done a great job in Brooklyn," said John Buretta, Miller's predecessor in the criminal division until last November when he joined the law firm Cravath, Swaine & Moore. U.S. Justice Department announces clemency review of drug offenders By Julia Edwards and Aruna Viswanatha WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Justice Department laid out new clemency guidelines on Wednesday that are expected to make thousands of drug offenders eligible for a reduction in the sentences they are currently serving. Under the new guidelines, inmates that were sentenced under laws that have since changed, have served at least 10 years of their sentence and are nonviolent may be re-examined by the Justice Department and suggested to the president for clemency. Deputy Attorney General James Cole, who announced the details of the plan, said the most obvious candidates for review were those sentenced before a 2010 law that lowered the terms for crack cocaine possession charges. "These older, stringent punishments that are out of line with sentences imposed under today's laws erode people's confidence in our criminal justice system," Cole said at a news conference on Wednesday. U.S. Army plans to remove about 2,000 officers due to budget cuts By Jim Forsyth SAN ANTONIO, Texas (Reuters) - The U.S. Army is looking to cut about 2,000 positions for captains and majors by the end of the year as part of its overall plans to reduce its active duty numbers due to budget cuts, the Army's chief of staff said on Wednesday. "Probably this year, we will ask 1,500 captains to leave the service, and we will ask probably 400 to 500 majors to leave the service," General Ray Odierno, the Army's top officer, told reporters at an event in Texas. "That is because we have to get down to the appropriate size." The Pentagon said last month it would shrink the U.S. Army to pre-World War Two levels, eliminate the popular A-10 aircraft and reduce military benefits in order to meet 2015 budget spending caps. He said the planned cut of the Army to 490,000 active duty soldiers will be reached by the end of 2015 and will not prevent the service from carrying out its current missions. Man to be sentenced in retirement home deaths DETROIT (AP) — A judge is expected to order life sentences for a 67-year-old man convicted of killing two women at a Detroit retirement home. Obama rejects notion that trade deal is in danger TOKYO (AP) — As negotiators struggle, President Barack Obama is rejecting suggestions that an Asia-Pacific trade deal is in danger and says the U.S. and Japan must take bold steps to overcome differences that are threatening completion of the cornerstone of his strategic rebalance to the region. Man to be sentenced in Detroit nursing home deaths DETROIT (AP) — A judge is expected to order life sentences for a 67-year-old man convicted of killing two women at a Detroit retirement home. Tape released of woman who pointed gun at Ford SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Nearly 40 years after a former Manson family member pointed a gun at President Gerald Ford, the audiotape from her pretrial psychiatric examination has been made public. Oklahoma court rejects death-row inmates' claims OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The Oklahoma Supreme Court has ruled that two death row inmates are not entitled to know the source of the drugs that will be used to kill them, putting them both on track to be executed as early as next week. Vermont moves toward labeling of GMO foods MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — Vermont lawmakers have passed the country's first state bill to require the labeling of genetically modified foods, underscoring a division between powerful lobbyists for the U.S. food industry and an American public that overwhelmingly says it approves of the idea. Tiny Pacific nation sues 9 nuclear-armed powers NEW YORK (AP) — The tiny Pacific nation of the Marshall Islands is taking on the United States and the world's eight other nuclear-armed nations with an unprecedented lawsuit demanding that they meet their obligations toward disarmament and accusing them of "flagrant violations" of international law. Biologists watching fish runs after deadly slide DARRINGTON, Wash. (AP) — Fisheries biologist Pete Verhey waded through the cold, clear creek that feeds into the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River, scanning riffles and side channels looking for evidence of fish eggs. Cleared of murder, man starts fresh 24 years later NEW YORK (AP) — The day Jonathan Fleming was cleared of the murder that put him behind bars for almost 25 years, he strode out of a courthouse to congratulations from passers-by, a steak dinner with his family and the start of a new life. Tokyo court starts Mt. Gox bankruptcy proceedings TOKYO (AP) — Bankruptcy proceedings began Thursday for the Mt. Gox bitcoin exchange, a move that was widely expected after the Tokyo District Court decided earlier this month that the company would not be able to resurrect itself. Camilla's brother dies in New York of head injury NEW YORK (AP) — The Prince of Wales and his wife, Camilla, are "utterly devastated" by the death of her brother, who fell outside a hotel bar and suffered a head injury, British royal officials said. 10 Things to Know for Today Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today: Miami Beach theater evacuated after popcorn fire MIAMI BEACH, Fla. (AP) — A small fire that started in a popcorn machine caused the evacuation of a Miami Beach movie theater. Judge releases tape of would-be assassin's exam SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Nearly 40 years after a former Manson family member pointed a gun at President Gerald Ford, the audiotape from her pretrial psychiatric examination has been made public. Mississippi sets 20-week limit on abortions (Reuters) - Mississippi will ban abortions after more than 20 weeks of pregnancy from July, joining other conservative U.S. states that have placed restrictions on the procedure. A handful of states have in recent years enacted laws that place restrictions on the procedure, especially on late-term abortions, citing hotly debated medical research that a fetus feels pain at 20 weeks of gestation, halfway through a full-term pregnancy. "Today is an important day for protecting the unborn and the health and safety of women in Mississippi," Governor Phil Bryant said in a statement after signing the bill, which becomes law on July 1. In Mississippi, abortions would be legal after 20 weeks if a woman's life was in danger or if the fetus suffers "from fetal abnormalities so great that life outside the womb is not viable," said Bryant, a Republican. Images released of shipwreck in San Francisco Bay SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The first images of the newly discovered wreckage of a steamship that sank in San Francisco Bay in 1888, killing 16 people, were released Wednesday by federal ocean scientists. In Disney's shadow, homeless families struggle KISSIMMEE, Fla. (AP) — When they moved from Georgia to the theme park playground of central Florida four years ago, Anthony and Candice Johnson found work at a barbecue restaurant and a 7-Eleven. Their combined salaries nevertheless fell short of what they needed to rent an apartment, so the couple and their two children have instead been hopping among cheap motel rooms along U.S. 192. Oregon gay marriage ban gets day in court EUGENE, Ore. (AP) — Lawyers for four gay and lesbian couples and the state of Oregon urged a federal judge Wednesday to strike down Oregon's voter-approved ban on same-sex marriage. Last year's deadbeats do best as stocks stall NEW YORK (AP) — Financial markets rarely stick to the script, and this year is no different. 6 fired for closing Arizona child abuse reports PHOENIX (AP) — Five senior Arizona child welfare employees were fired for orchestrating a plan that led to more than 6,500 Arizona child abuse and neglect cases being closed without investigations, officials said. Management, safety cited for radiation release ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Poor management, an eroding safety culture, ineffective maintenance and a lack of proper oversight are being blamed for a radiation release that contaminated 21 workers and shuttered the federal government's nuclear waste dump two months ago in southeastern New Mexico. 2-week truce for hot sauce maker, California city LOS ANGELES (AP) — A cooling-off period has been called in the fight between the makers of a popular hot sauce and the Southern California city that says its air is too spicy to bear. Fetal tissue used to power Oregon homes PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — An Oregon county commission has ordered an incinerator to stop accepting boxed medical waste to generate electricity after learning the waste it's been burning may include tissue from aborted fetuses from British Columbia. Your Top Plays for Today Your Top Plays for Today: AP's Sports Guide Technology group to decide Cover Oregon's future PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — After weeks of deliberation, a committee is poised to make a final recommendation Thursday on what to do with Oregon's botched health insurance exchange portal. Stowaway on jet said to be homesick for Africa HONOLULU (AP) — A security video shows the California boy who survived stowing away on a jetliner dangling his feet from the aircraft's wheel well after arriving in Hawaii, before jumping 8 to 10 feet to the ground and collapsing, an airport official says. Wyoming gas explosion prompts evacuation of town OPAL, Wyo. (AP) — Residents and emergency crews were waiting for a fire to burn itself out after an explosion at a natural gas processing plant in a small town in southwestern Wyoming. Camilla's brother dies in NY of head injury NEW YORK (AP) — The Prince of Wales and his wife, Camilla, are "utterly devastated" by the death of her brother, who fell outside a hotel bar and suffered a head injury. U.S. Army opens hearing for soldier accused of murders in Iraq By Jonathan Kaminsky OLYMPIA, Washington (Reuters) - The U.S. Army convened a pre-trial evidentiary hearing on Wednesday for a soldier accused of shooting dead two deaf, unarmed Iraqi boys in 2007. Sergeant First Class Michael Barbera faces two counts of premeditated murder stemming from the incident. The court proceeding, called an Article 32 hearing, is being held at Washington state's Joint Base Lewis-McChord and is expected to last five days, Army spokesman Lieutenant Colonel Dennis Swanson said. Last June, U.S. Army Staff Sergeant Robert Bales pleaded guilty to killing 16 unarmed Afghan civilians in 2012. Californians overwhelmingly approve new education standards: poll Most Californians support dramatic changes set to take hold in public education, including funneling more money to schools with disadvantaged students and implementing rigorous national standards known as the common core curriculum, a new poll shows. Nearly three-quarters of Californians also say they support free preschool for all 4-year-olds, a measure that has been proposed by Democrats in the legislature but met with skepticism by Governor Jerry Brown, the poll by the Public Policy Institute of California released Wednesday night showed. "Public support is solidly behind the significant changes that are being made to school funding and classroom curricula this year," said PPIC President Mark Baldassare. After hearing a brief description of the Common Core, criticized by some conservatives as a federal takeover of local public schools because the Obama administration is pushing for the change, 69 percent of California residents interviewed said they supported the standards, Baldassare said in a news release. WRHL 2014-04-24T13:35:39Z http://www.wrhl.net/pages/index.cfm?id=491